Boredom and Weekends Away: What to do with Your Backyard Chickens

Keeping Your Chickens Busy

5 chickens sitting on a fence

Your chooks love to free-range and peck at bugs, weeds, and grasses. But, locked-up chooks can foster some destructive behaviour, such as bullying.

Your ladies are happiest when they’re not only eating but when they’re active. So you may be inclined to dish out some treats to fix the boredom on days with undesirable weather.

But spoiling them isn’t so good for their health.

Luckily, you can do many things to create an outdoor entertainment system for your feathered friends to keep their brains and little bodies busy.

Here are a few examples.

Food Play

chickens eating greens hanging from the roof of the chicken coop

Hanging food plants from the roof of your backyard chicken coop gives all types of chickens something to do and keeps them active. Fill old hanging baskets with weeds and greens. A thick cut from a grassy patch of turf will keep chickens entertained for ages.

Put Those Old CDs to Good Use

Make a rope of CDs using old bale twine (aka hay string, which comes off bales of straw). Tie a few CDs together, so they make some noise when they clang together. Chickens like to peck at shiny objects, especially if it moves.

Straw, Hay & Lucerne Bales

rooster and chickens pecking at hay stack

Stack small bales of straw, hay, or lucerne into stepped pyramids. Most breeds of chickens love heights and will jump on and off and chase each other around the base. This is entertaining for chooks locked up over the weekends. Throw a handful of mixed grains over the bales for some extra entertainment.

Chook Footy

Free-range poultry farmers discovered that chooks love to play football. Birds are attracted to colourful objects - such as balls. The chicken pecks the ball, it moves, and they go at it again. This toy will tap into their instinct to hunt moving objects and their curiosity for shiny things.

What to Do with Your Chickens When You Go on Holidays

four chickens rooster sitting on a wall

Just because you have chickens in the backyard doesn’t mean you’re tied to your home and can’t leave on a well-deserved break. With a bit of planning, you can have the best of both worlds. Happy chooks and a holiday away.

If you’re only going for the weekend (Friday afternoon to Sunday afternoon), backyard chickens can be left at home alone — but only in mild weather. 

If a heatwave or storm is forecast, I don’t recommend leaving them unattended. Want tips for chicken care during a heatwave? See my survival guide.

Some things to consider when you go away:

Do

  • Visit daily in hot or windy weather
  • Have a friend or pet-sitter visit at least every 2nd day. Up to twice a day on hot days
  • Make sure your birds are familiar with their house and run
  • Make sure your chicken coops and run are predator and vermin (sparrow, mouse, and snake) proof
  • Invest in a good quality chicken coop feeder - a self-feeder. If using a pedal feeder, ensure your birds know how to use it.
  • Leave enough feed for the time you’re away

Don’t

  • Leave more than one whole day with no supervision in hot or stormy weather
  • Leave young chicks alone

Keeping your ladies active and out of harm's way will see them stay happy and healthy. Do you have any boredom-busting tips for your flock? Drop me a line - elise@chickencoach.com, comment below or visit our Facebook page


Want your chickens to be the healthiest and happiest they can be? I offer backyard chicken workshops, online programs, phone coaching, and in-person support to families, schools, and free-range egg farmers. Visit my online shop for natural, tried-and-tested poultry supplies in Australia.

Become an expert in Backyard Chickens 101 and check here for the latest tips and trends all about chooks.

Elise McNamara, Chicken Consultant & Educator.

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